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Friday, March 14, 2014

Court Awards $26 Million in Age Discrimination Case

Hard-working employees throughout the state of Florida, whether they are in Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa or beyond, are protected under the Fair labor Standards Act (FSLA) when it comes to filing a claim regarding their employer's unfair practices. The law protects workers from being penalized for blowing the whistle on a company's perceived violations of the law, whether the employee cites unlawful hour and wage policies, discrimination or other issues.

This protection from retaliation was demonstrated through a recent case out of Los Angeles in which the LA Superior Court awarded former Staples worker Bobby Nickel $3.2 million in compensatory damages and more than $22.8 million in punitive damages, as the jury found that the plaintiff was a victim of age discrimination, the LA Daily News reports.

The 66-year-old alleged that a manager prompted him to resign from his job as a facilities manager at Staples (which acquired Corporate Express in 2008, six years after Nickel began his job there) since the managers were trying to discharge of the older employees originally employed by Corporate Express who made more money than the workers Staples hired. He also claimed that co-workers often made jokes at his expense, referring to Nickel as "old coot" and "old goat."

Following his refusal to resign, co-workers and managers began to falsely accuse him of wrongdoing and continued the harassment. In addition, one of the company's receptionists confided in Nickel that management demanded she provide a false statement about Nickel's conduct- she refused.

While defense attorneys argued that Staples wasn't in the wrong, the court obviously made a decision in favor of Nickel in what represents the largest verdict of its kind in LA county history, according to Nickel's attorney Carney Shegerian.

The lawyer said his client's stellar work history helped win the case. According to the LA Daily News article, Shegerian said: "He has a long history of being a hard working, ethical professional who had held his position of employment for almost a decade prior to his wrongful termination. This verdict and the justice served will hopefully put employers on notice that they cannot discriminate against employees based on age."


Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Alleged Pregnancy Discrimination Case Makes Headlines After Nearly a Decade

AOL CEO Tim Armstrong has been under fire in the news this week for blaming the company's 401K benefit cuts on the medical treatment costs of two workers' "distressed babies", for which he claims the company paid $2 million total. He has since reversed the decision, and restored the company's previous 401K contributions.

The former Google vice president of national sales allegedly has a history of calling attention to traumatic situations his employees experience. Back in 2005, Google sales director Christine Elwell sued her then-boss, Armstrong, alleging that he demoted then fired her during a particularly difficult pregnancy.

Pregnancy Still Cited As Reason for Workplace Discrimination 35 Years After the Pregnancy Discrimination Act 

Elwell, who was pregnant with quadruplets at the time, was under doctors' orders not get on an airplane for the duration of her pregnancy. According to Elwell, Armstrong demoted her shortly after she announced her temporary limitations and then fired her on the phone one month later. The suit alleges that Elwell discussed her demotion with her fellow workers, leading Armstrong to call her "an HR nightmare." As per Elwell's employment agreement, the lawsuit against Armstrong was moved into settlement, the outcome of which is private.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed sex discrimination and was amended to include the Pregnancy Discrimination Act in 1978. The act sought to prevent the unfair treatment of women in the workplace because of a pregnancy, childbirth or maternity leave.

Contact a Tampa Pregnancy Discrimination Lawyer

It's unfortunate that this 35-year-old law is still relevant in today's world. The experienced pregnancy discrimination attorneys of Feldman Morgado, P.A. in Tampa, Florida represent female employees who were somehow discriminated against at work for being pregnant. If you are facing a difficult situation at work for personal reasons surrounding your pregnancy, we can inform you of your rights through a free consultation. We will seek the appropriate legal remedies for your unique situation, and fight for the outcome most favorable to you. Give us at call at 888-779-6921 for personalized attention and some quick answers.

 

 


Thursday, November 14, 2013

Florida Women Protected by Federal Pregnancy Discrimination Laws

With the recent appointment of accomplished executive and mother-to-be Marissa Mayer as Yahoo!'s new CEO making headlines about the relationship between pregnancy and career, all working women should review the law that protects them from discrimination based on their pregnancy or childbirth.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act is an amendment to the Civil Rights Act that protects women from workplace discrimination arising from a pregnancy or childbirth and any related conditions. It bars employers from discriminating against a woman because she is pregnant in any decisions regarding hiring, firing, promotion, job assignment, layoff, fringe benefit or training.

The law requires employers to grant disability leave or leave without pay for pregnant women if they offer similar leave to other disabled employees. Additionally, pregnant women must be permitted to work as long as they are able to perform their essential work duties, allowing for reasonable accommodation. Light duty and alternative assignments must be offered to pregnant women if these options are available to other disabled workers.

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act also protects pregnant women from being overlooked for wage increases, seniority considerations and vacation time. Employers cannot omit women from these decisions based on their pregnancies, just as they cannot omit other temporarily disabled employees.

More Protections: The Family and Medical Leave Act & Health Insurance

In addition to the protections granted by the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, parents are also protected by the Family and Medical Leave Act. This law allows parents - biological, foster and adoptive - to take up to 12 weeks of leave to care for their new child. Employers may offer paid or unpaid leave and parents are only eligible if they worked for their employer for 12 months prior to start of the leave.

Laws also exist to protect the health insurance rights of pregnant employees. Companies must provide health insurance that covers pregnancy-related conditions if it provides coverage for other medical conditions. Employers must extend these rights to the wives of male employees as they do health benefits to the husbands of female employees.

Pregnant workers are protected from employer discrimination based on their conditions. If you believe you have been discriminated against because of a pregnancy or birth, please contact an experienced employment lawyer.


Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Florida Man Fired for High Medicals Costs for Daughter’s Cancer Treatments

A Florida man has sued his employer for wrongful termination, claiming that he was fired, not for falsifying time sheet records, as the company claims, but because of his daughter's high medical costs. The case shows employees that it is possible to hold employers responsible for wrongful termination.

Man Asserts He Was Fired Due to Daughter's High Medical Expenses

The Palm Beach County man was fired at his job at a bank on the pretext that he falsified his timesheet. However, the man believes the real reason he was let go was the high cost of his late daughter's cancer treatments. He is suing for damages of $15,000, the lowest amount needed for the lawsuit to be taken up by the circuit court in Florida.

Before the man was fired, his daughter's treatments required him to work at multiple locations and often work less than full-time. However, he was allowed to work remotely and his compassionate coworkers would fill in the time he missed. However, the bank's corporate office was less accommodating and began calling the man and his wife to inquire about his daughter's treatments, long-term care and associated costs.

Three days before the man's daughter was scheduled for surgery, he was fired for purportedly faking information on his timesheet. Company policy requires a supervisor's approval of workers' timesheets, compliance with which was difficult since the man worked remotely and at several different locations. He asserts that the timesheet in question was approved by his supervisor and he was given no opportunity to explain his side of the story before being fired.

After he was terminated, the hospital canceled his daughter's treatment due to lack of health insurance. Fortunately, the community rallied behind him and a charity funded the surgery. In his lawsuit, the man also asserts that his employer failed to provide him information on how to extend his life insurance and health insurance coverage after his termination, as required by law. Doing so would have allowed the surgery to go ahead without billing complications.

How Employees Can Fight a Wrongful Termination

Generally, employers cannot make hiring, firing, promotion, pay, benefits and other decisions based on an employee's race, gender, age, disability, religion, national origin or genetic information. Doing so constitutes employment discrimination. Included in these prohibitions are employment decisions based on an employee's association with a person with a disabling condition. This would include the Florida man's terminally-ill daughter. The man asserts that his employer's pretext for firing him covered up the real reason it wanted to terminate his employment - his daughter's rising medical costs, a claim the company denies.

If an employee suspects he or she was fired due to disability, race, gender, religion, age, national origin or genetic information, he or she should enlist the help of an experienced employment law attorney. A lawyer can help employees understand their rights under federal and state law and recover appropriate damages.


Saturday, November 09, 2013

Florida hospital faces discrimination suit

A Miami-based hospital system faces a lawsuit filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the federal agency responsible for enforcing federal employment discrimination laws, on behalf of a doctor working at its Doctor's Hospital in Coral Gables. The suit alleges that the hospital discriminated against the doctor in refusing to accommodate her disability.

Lawsuit alleges disability discrimination

The EEOC's suit states that when the doctor was applying for a position as a general medical practitioner at Doctor's Hospital's Gamma Knife Center, run by Baptist Health South Florida, she informed the doctor who interviewed her that she had epilepsy, which meant that she could not work more than eight hours per day. The interviewing doctor agreed that this request was reasonable. The doctor received a position at Doctor's Hospital after interviewing with other hospital staff members.

Almost immediately after she began working, the hospital scheduled her for shifts exceeding eight hours. After experiencing deteriorating health, the doctor renewed her request that she not work more than eight hours in a day. The hospital refused to accommodate her, and the doctor lost her job a few days after the decision.

The doctor reported the hospital to the EEOC, and the EEOC attempted to mediate an agreement between the doctor and the hospital. After mediation failed, the EEOC filed suit alleging that the hospital's refusal to offer the doctor a reasonable accommodation by modifying her work schedule violated the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Laws preventing disability discrimination

The ADA prohibits employers from discriminating against qualified employees with disabilities or perceived disabilities in hiring, terminating, promoting, assigning job duties, pay or any other aspect of employment. Employers may not ask screening questions during interviews or on job applications to try to eliminate candidates with disabilities.

The ADA also requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities so employees can perform the essential functions of their jobs, as long as such accommodations do not make the employer incur significant expense or cause undue hardship to the business. Some examples of accommodations include wheelchair access, TTYs for telephones or training materials in Braille.

In order to qualify for ADA protections, the employee must have a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities such as sight, hearing, walking or speaking. The condition must have lasted for six months or more, or the employee must have a history of having the condition.

Talk to a lawyer

Despite the fact that laws prohibit employers from discriminating against employees with disabilities, disability discrimination still occurs with distressing frequency. If you have experienced employment discrimination because of a disability, speak with a skilled employment discrimination attorney who can help you recover damages for the violation of your rights.


Friday, November 08, 2013

Florida courts are split on pregnancy discrimination lawsuits

Recently, a former "The Price Is Right" model sued for pregnancy discrimination. The California court awarded her $7.7 million in punitive damages. She had previously been awarded $777,000 in actual damages due to the discrimination. The woman alleged that the show's producers were angry to hear of her pregnancy and ignored her when she tried to return to work after giving birth. Luckily, California recognizes pregnancy discrimination.

Florida women who are victims of pregnancy discrimination may have a more difficult time. In Florida, courts weigh the issues of pregnancy discrimination differently in different areas of the state. Although pregnancy discrimination is a federal offense, it is not technically illegal under Florida state laws.

Pregnancy discrimination is not against Florida law

Pregnancy discrimination is not specifically listed as a type of discrimination in Florida law. The state law only prohibits workplace discrimination on the grounds of "race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap, or marital status."

Recently in a case in the 3rd District Court of Appeal in Miami, a pregnancy discrimination lawsuit was dismissed for this reason. The complainant was instructed to bring her case to federal court but she dropped the lawsuit instead, despite the fact that legal experts believe she had a solid case of workplace discrimination.

Proving pregnancy discrimination in Florida

However, some Florida state courts have ruled on pregnancy discrimination cases despite a concrete law on the issue by using other Florida laws to prove discrimination.

In one 2008 case in the 4th Circuit in West Palm Beach, the court claimed that Florida law does make pregnancy discrimination illegal because this type of discrimination falls under laws regarding sex discrimination. Another case in the 1990s claimed pregnancy discrimination was covered by Florida law because Florida's Human Rights Act was modeled after Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. As a result, the Civil Rights Act was altered in 1978 to include pregnancy discrimination.

No clear answer

As long as Florida law remains without a clear position regarding pregnancy discrimination, this will continue to be a problem for women who work. If you have been a victim of pregnancy discrimination or any other type of discrimination in the workplace, seek legal advice. An attorney with a background in discrimination cases can help you get compensation you have been denied. No one deserves to be a victimized by workplace discrimination.


Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Florida and Federal Law Protect Workplace Sexual Harassment Victims

An employee of a Miami probation firm recently filed a lawsuit alleging that a supervisor and other employees were sexually harassing her in the workplace. That employee is not alone. In 2010, over 11,000 claims of sexual harassment were filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) - a federal agency charged with protecting the quality of life among American employees. Over 16 percent of these cases were reported by men.

As long as it is unwelcome, any of the following may constitute sexual harassment:

Posters, pictures and emails that are sexual in nature
Physical contact (including inappropriate touching of clothing and kissing)
Verbal or written comments about someone's physical appearance, including clothing
Asking about someone's sex life
Both federal and Florida law provide some protection for victims of sexual harassment, and the law accounts for the fact that every individual situation is different.

In order to file a sexual harassment claim in Florida, the employer must be made aware of the conduct. Most employers have handbooks that explain the process required for an employee to internally report sexual harassment. Following the process is an important step in making sure that the appropriate people know about the harassment.

In addition to making an employer aware of the conduct, someone claiming sexual harassment must file a claim with either the EEOC (the federal agency) or the Florida Human Relations Commission (FHRC). The agency must process the claim before a judge will hear the case. Sometimes, the agencies can solve or settle the claim without ever having to go to court. However, when appropriate, the agency will give a person claiming harassment a "right to sue" letter which allows that person to go to court.

Someone experiencing sexual harassment can take a number of steps for protection early on. Making it clear that the contact is unwelcome (i.e., by saying "no") is one step. If the behavior happens more than once, keeping a log or writing down everything that happens is another step. Finally, talking with a sexual harassment lawyer can help.

A person who wants to sue for sexual harassment can hire a lawyer at any step in this process - even before notifying the employer - and that person does not have to wait until the case actually goes to court. Sexual harassment lawyers can provide assistance at any time.


Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Florida Cities Adopt a Peculiar Practice: Hire Only Nonsmokers

In an interesting interpretation of discrimination laws, some south Florida municipalities are instituting hiring bans on a very specific group of individuals: smokers. The new policies have spurred controversy over their constitutionality and whether smokers are a protected group under federal anti-discrimination laws.

No Smokers Need Apply in Some Florida Towns

In an effort to cut mounting health insurance costs, some south Florida cities and towns have instituted hiring bans on smokers. Since 2005, the city of Hollywood has required all new job applicants to sign an affidavit declaring they have not used tobacco in the past year. Once hired, getting caught smoking while employed by the city is grounds for immediate discharge. Smoking employees hired before 2005 are grandfathered in and cannot be fired for continuing to use tobacco.

In Broward County, new hires are not subject to the same scrutiny, but county employees who use tobacco must pay a $20, bi-weekly surcharge to cover increased health insurance costs. The county also offers cessation programs and access to anti-smoking aids like nicotine gum.

Are Bans on Hiring Smokers Effective?

Unfortunately, bans on hiring smokers are not proven to be effective at reducing health care costs. In the mid-1990s, North Miami instituted a hiring ban on smokers but dropped the policy several years ago after data found the policy no longer held health costs at bay, though it did initially help reduce premiums. The policy also led to a lawsuit against the city over the constitutionality of the controversial policy.

Are Smokers Protected by Discrimination Laws?

Unfortunately, current discrimination laws do not protect smokers from hiring bans. Federal employment discrimination laws only apply to race, national origin, religion, gender and disabilities. These are considered protected groups and employers, including municipalities, cannot discriminate against job applicants based on their belonging to one or more of these groups. Employment discrimination laws apply to hiring and firing, promotions, pay determinations and opportunities for training.

States and local governments are allowed to implement their own anti-discrimination laws that may protect gays and lesbians, those on welfare and parents from employment discrimination. However, in Florida, smokers are not considered a protected group by current law, as determined by a 5-2 vote by the state Supreme Court.

Opponents of the hiring bans, however, believe that the bans infringe on the personal freedoms of applicants and are too far-reaching since they require employees and applicants to change their behaviors outside of work. Until Florida's laws are changed to include smokers as a protected group, however, the bans will be considered constitutional.

If you have been denied a job because of tobacco use or have suffered from discrimination in the workplace, contact an experienced employment law lawyer to understand your rights.


Sunday, November 03, 2013

Equal Opportunity Employment Agency Updates Complaint Process Rules

The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has released final rule changes that should streamline its complaint process for employees. Employees are protected from workplace discrimination by federal law and can pursue a discrimination complaint through the EEOC when they feel their rights have been violated.

The EEOC is a federal agency that enforces the country's equal opportunity employment laws. These laws prohibit employers from discriminating against employees or job applicants in hiring, firing, promotion, benefits and other employment decisions. Employers cannot discriminate against an employee or job applicant based on their race, color, gender, age, religion, national origin, disability or genetic information. Most employers with over 15 employees must comply with EEOC rules.

When it receives a complaint of workplace discrimination, the EEOC makes a decision to file a lawsuit against the employer to protect the interests and rights of the individual and the public. While both public and private employees are protected by discrimination laws, the EEOC is not required to file a lawsuit for each individual who files a discrimination complaint.

Changes to the EEOC Complaint Process

Now, the EEOC has made several changes to its complaint process to make it more efficient. A few changes involve employees directly. The EEOC now encourages all employees to make complaints electronically rather than through the mail, unless there is a good reason for not filing electronically.

Additionally, agencies must now notify employees in writing if their complaints have not been completed within 180 days and remind employees of their right to file immediately for a hearing and civil action regarding the complaint. Lastly, government employees now have the same protection from employer retaliation as private employees.

Other changes concern employers and how complaints are handled within the EEOC. One major change relates to complaints regarding action against personnel, like firing and promotion decisions. This change is meant to deter unscrupulous employers from proposing termination of an employee as retaliation for filing an EEOC complaint.

The new rules also give new teeth to administrative law judge (ALJ) decisions in class action complaint cases. Prior to the change, agencies could choose to accept, reject or change aspects of an ALJ's decision in such cases. Now, the agencies must accept or appeal the decision.

Lastly, the new EEOC rules will now allow agencies to experiment with the complaint process, with the EEOC's permission. This rule is intended to help make the complaint process more efficient, but some believe the new rule will do more harm than good and make the process more complex. Since this process is complex, it is important that those wishing to file a complaint contact an experienced employment law lawyer to help them through the complaint filing process.

Many hope that the new changes to the EEOC's workplace discrimination complaint process may help employees who are victims of workplace discrimination hold employers accountable. If you believe you have suffered from discrimination in the workplace, contact an attorney.


Saturday, November 02, 2013

Discrimination against obese people in the workplace

Even though more than one third of the adult population in the U.S. is obese, social and workplace discrimination against obese people is persistent and pervasive.

Obesity is medical condition in which a person accumulates excessive body fat to the extent that it may have an adverse effect on health. It is determined by a person's body mass index (BMI.) In general, a BMI of 25 to 29 is overweight, a BMI of 30 to 35 is obese, and a BMI of 35 or greater is considered morbidly obese.

According to a recent online Harris Interactive/HealthDay survey, 61 percent of 2,300 individuals polled did not consider negative comments about someone's weight to be offensive, and a quarter of those polled believed that employer policies that discriminate in hiring based solely on a person being obese were "fair."

Additionally, the individuals polled were also asked about their body mass index (BMI), and the results were as follows: 32 percent were normal weight, 29 percent were overweight, 17 percent were obese, and 13 percent were morbidly obese. (Presumably, 8 percent did not respond to the question.)

Approximately two-fifths of the obese and morbidly obese respondents felt they had been shunned socially, and 52 percent believed they had been discriminated against in the job market when applying for a job or promotion. That belief has a basis in reality. For example, a hospital in Texas recently announced that it would not hire people with a BMI higher than 35-the morbidly obese-due to concerns about personal appearance.

As evidenced by the results of this poll, the obese face an unwarranted and unsubstantiated bias that they are wholly responsible for their condition due to laziness, ignorance and a lack of discipline, when, in fact, genetics play a substantial role in obesity, especially with those morbidly obese.

Filing a claim under the ADA

In cases of employment discrimination, morbidly obese people can pursue a claim under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its updated version, the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act (ADAAA), which went into effect in January 2009. Those applying, however, must prove they have a disability that was the reason behind the employment discrimination.

Generally, under the ADA and ADAAA, to qualify as someone with a disability, a person must:

Have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activity. Main examples include walking, talking, hearing, seeing, listening and caring for oneself; or
Have a history of such an impairment; or
Be regarded as having such an impairment
The ADA and ADAAA prohibit employers from discriminating on the basis of disability in hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, and other areas of employment, and they require employers to make "reasonable accommodations" in the work environment or work requirements that enable an applicant or employee to perform a job.

Hope for obesity discrimination

Obesity claims under the ADA, unfortunately, are usually met with difficulty, but the success of the recent lawsuit, EEOC v. Resources for Human Development, provides a positive turning point for those with morbid obesity.

The EEOC filed a lawsuit in federal court against Resources for Human Development under the ADA on behalf of a woman. The suit claimed that the defendant fired her illegally based on her obesity. The woman had worked at the facility as a prevention and intervention specialist for eight years and had been rated "excellent" in numerous employment evaluations over the years. She was 5'2" and weighed 400 pounds when she was hired and weighed more than 500 pounds when she was fired.

The main question the court had to consider was whether the EEOC had proven whether the woman was legally disabled either by her having a substantially limiting physical impairment due to her morbid obesity or because she was regarded as having such impairment. If that threshold was met, the EEOC would then need to show that the woman had been qualified to perform her job.

The court concluded that severe or morbid obesity does qualify as a disability under the ADA whether it actually exists or is perceived to exist by an employer.

The success of the suit prompted the EEOC General Counsel to comment that "severe obesity is no exception" to unlawful discrimination, and that "it is important for employers to realize that stereotypes, myths, and biases about that condition should not be the basis of employment decisions."

Seeking the help of an employment discrimination attorney

If you feel you have been discriminated against in the workplace due to severe obesity, seeking out the advice of an experienced disability discrimination attorney who can help you file a claim with the EEOC or the Florida Human Rights Commission is advised.


Tuesday, October 29, 2013

As Florida Unemployment Rates Rise, So Do Unemployment Denials

There is more bad news for the recently unemployed - Florida law is making it harder to get unemployment benefits. The new law imposes stricter qualifications before someone can be approved to receive benefits. After the new law was in effect for three months, nearly two-thirds of people applying for benefits were denied.

Some claim that the new law denies unemployment benefits for people who genuinely need the benefits and hits them when they are in a time of greatest need - when they have just lost their jobs. One Florida law firm has even asked the federal government to step in to make sure people with disabilities or non-English speakers are not victimized by discrimination in the process of applying for unemployment benefits.

Florida Modifies Unemployment Benefit Guidelines

One new change to the law is the requirement of reporting job searches on a weekly basis. Recipients of unemployment benefits must post applications of five jobs per week or make appointments with a government jobs counselor. According to Florida, not complying with the reporting is the primary reason people are denied benefits.

The job search reporting can only be done online, which may pose problems for people who either could never afford Internet service or no longer can afford it because of a recent layoff. Other problems with the online-only system include difficulty understanding how to use computers and limited proficiency in writing and reading in English. Additionally, disabled Floridians may be unable to use a computer to submit their reports.

In Florida, anyone who is not employed (or does not work a full-time job) can make a claim for unemployment benefits. Florida's unemployment agency will make two determinations in order to give someone benefits. The first decision is whether someone has worked enough and made enough money (a little more than $3,000) in the former job to qualify for benefits.

The second decision depends on the reason why the employee is no longer working and whether the person is currently able to work. After a determination that the applicant qualifies for unemployment benefits, he or she must comply with the new on-going reporting rules.

Employment Laws at the Time of Layoff or Termination

When a company lays someone off, the employer has certain responsibilities. First, although employees are not entitled to be paid for unused but earned vacation time at the end of an employment, if the company has a policy of doing so, it must honor that policy. The company cannot discriminate against certain employees to provide that benefit. If the employer does it for one employee, the employer must do it for everyone. Failure to follow these employment laws may allow an employee to file suit against the employer.

Second, in regard to medical benefits, someone recently laid off has sixty-two days until an employer is no longer required to provide medical benefits for employees. Florida law requires employers to give employees what are called certificates of creditable coverage (upon request); this document will help show a new insurance provider that an employee had insurance, so the new company cannot claim that any health conditions were "preexisting" and therefore not under the coverage. Employers who neglect this responsibility can be held accountable under state law.

Getting laid off or losing your job is already stressful for a number of reasons. But there is help including unemployment compensation benefits and other employment laws. If your employer fails to comply with these important employee protections, contact a skilled Florida employment law attorney.


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The attorneys at Feldman Morgado PA assist employees involved in overtime and wage and hour disputes as well as employment discrimination matters in Tampa, Miami, Broward County, Fort Lauderdale, Saint Petersburg, Clearwater and throughout Florida.



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